Grilled Asparagus with Serrano Ham and Lemon Aioli

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Here is another quick and easy yet impressive appetiser for the festive season. It can all be prepared the day before and just grilled before serving. You could serve it as an entree or as part of an antipasto plate.

You will have leftover aioli as well, it goes really well with some Christmas ham and soft white bread.

Hope you all have a lovely Christmas with friends and family, lots of food and drinks and fun times!dsc_1376 dsc_1343

Recipe
Serves 6 as part of a platter
Ingredients
20 asparagus spears
20 very thin slices serrano ham
Olive oil
1/2 lemon
Handful fresh parsley, finely chopped
1/4 cup finely grated parmesan
Cracked pepper
Aioli (makes about 2 cups)
4 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tsp salt
4 egg yolks
2 cups olive oil
2 tbs french mustard
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
4 tbs water
Method
For the aioli, place the garlic, salt and egg yolks in the bowl of a small food processor and process until combined. With the motor running, start adding the oil in a slow and steady stream until all gone. Aioli should be thick and pale like soft butter. Transfer to a bowl and add the mustard, lemon juice, zest and enough water to loosen into a creamy consistency. Cover and keep in the fridge until needed.
For the asparagus, wrap each piece of asparagus with the ham, starting from the bottom and working towards the spear, leaving the spear uncovered.
Heat a grill pan over high heat and drizzle with a little olive oil. Grill the asparagus for about 5mins, turning frequently. Remove from pan and place on to a serving platter.
Sprinkle with the lemon juice, parmesan cheese, parsley and cracked pepper and serve with some of the aioli.
Enjoy!

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Indonesian Jackfruit and Mushroom Curry with Red Rice, Crispy Tempeh, Green Papaya Salad and Sweet Potato Chips

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Here is another curry recipe using the Indonesian Curry Paste from the last post. If you haven’t had jackfruit before, I strongly suggest you give it a go, especially if you are a vegan or vegetarian, it’s a great substitute for meat. It’s becoming easier to find in Australia, most good asian or indian grocers should have it in cans. Here in Indonesia it’s growing everywhere and most markets sell it by the piece, already cut, which is good because cutting a fresh one can be a very messy, sticky task. Check out my recipe for Smokey Pulled Jackfruit Burgers for another yummy way to use jackfruit.

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Recipe

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients

Curry

2 tbs sesame oil

1 cup Indonesian Curry Paste

500ml coconut milk

1 litre vegetable stock

4 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce

2 cans jackfruit, drained

200g chanterelle mushrooms (or any mushroom you like)

Bunch kale, roughly chopped

Bunch choy sum, roughly chopped

Green Papaya Salad

2 cups shredded green papaya

1 chilli, finely chopped

Juice of 3 limes

2 tablespoons palm sugar

1 tsp salt

Handful each of lemon basil, coriander and mint

Crispy Tempeh

1 piece tempeh, chopped into 2cm pieces

3 tbs Canola oil

3 tbs kecap manis

To serve

Cooked red rice

Lime wedges

Sweet potato chips

Method

For the curry, heat the sesame oil in a large wok over medium to high heat. Add the curry paste and cook, stirring, for about 1min until fragrant. Add the coconut milk, stock, tamari and jackfruit. Bring the boil, reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 45mins, or until jackfruit is very tender and starting to fall apart. Add water during this time if the sauce is becoming too thick and reduced.

Add the mushrooms, kale and choy sum and cook for a further 10mins or until mushrooms and greens are just cooked.

Meanwhile, for the green papaya salad, combine all the ingredients in a bowl, stir well, cover and refrigerate until needed.

When ready to serve, cook the tempeh. Heat the canola oil over medium heat in a frying pan. Add the tempeh and the kecap manis and cook, stirring, for about 5mins or until tempeh is crispy and golden brown.

Serve the curry with the cooked red rice, papaya salad, crispy tempeh, lime wedges and sweet potato chips.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

Indonesian Seafood Curry

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Indonesian Seafood Curry, so called because I made it in Indonesia with ingredients from the local market, definitely not because it is an authentic Indonesian curry. Still delicious as anything though!

I’ve been a bit slack on social media of late. Caught up in the shoeless island life. Sun, sea, fish bbq and countless margaritas…it’s been bliss.

Use this curry paste with any veggies, tempeh, tofu, eggs, seafood or meat. It would also work with rice instead of noodles. I’ll be posting a recipe for a jackfruit curry using the same curry paste soon.

Use less chillies if you aren’t up for a hot curry!

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Recipe

Ingredients

Curry Paste (makes about 3 cups)

1 red onion, peeled and chopped

10cm piece ginger, peeled and chopped

10 birdseye chillies

6 kaffir lime leaves

4 lemongrass stalks, white and pale green parts, peeled and chopped

Bunch fresh coriander, leaves, stalks and roots, washed and chopped

Whole bulb garlic, peeled and chopped

1/2 cup tamarind pulp

80g palm sugar

6 limes, juiced

1 tsp pepper

1 tsp turmeric powder

3 tsp coriander

2 tsp cumin

2 tsp salt

1/4 cup coconut oil

Curry

1 tbs sesame oil

1 1/2 cups curry paste

1 litre coconut cream

2 cups chicken or veg stock

3 tbs fish sauce

Bunch snake beans, chopped (about 2 cups)

3 asian eggplant, sliced into 3cm rounds

12 spears baby corn

2 bok choy, quartered

500g prawns

To serve

Cooked rice vermicelli

Fresh shallots, chopped

Fried shallots

Fresh coriander

Beansprouts

Chilli sambal

Method

In a large wok, heat the sesame oil over medium to high heat. Add the curry paste and cook, stirring, for about 1min until fragrant. Add the coconut cream, stock, fish sauce, beans, eggplant and corn. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce has thickened and vegetables are just tender, about 10mins. Add water if necessary.

Add the bok choy and prawns and cook for a further 3mins or until prawns are just cooked.

Serve curry in bowls over the cooked noodles and top with the fresh and fried shallots, coriander, beansprouts and sambal on the side.

 

 

 

Vegan Pandan Cake

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Pandan. Amazing. Smells and tastes like nothing else I’ve experienced, and the colour is something else! It is used in so many desserts in many asian countries, but also works beautifully in savoury dishes like curries and rice. Fortunately lots of Asian grocers in Australia now stock Pandan leaves, and will definitely stock the Pandan essence I used for this cake. The Cassava flour turns the cake into more of a pudding texture, it is unusual but delicious. I iced this cake with condensed milk that was simmered and reduced with Pandan essence to form a sort of caramel. But if you want to keep the cake vegan, I would suggest using a simple icing of icing sugar, lemon juice and pandan essence.
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Recipe

Ingredients

4 cups cassava flour

1 1/2 cups palm sugar

3 tsp baking powder

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1 tsp ground ginger

1/4 tsp salt

3 cups coconut milk

2 tsp chia seeds mixed with 2 tbs water

1 tsp pandan essence

1/4 cup white vinegar

Method

Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees celsius. Grease and line a 30cm cake tin.

In a large bowl combine the flour, palm sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger and salt.

Add the coconut milk, chia, pandan essence and vinegar. Stir to combine.

Spoon into prepared pan and bake for about 40-50mins or until risen and springs back to the touch.

Cool in pan.

Turn out and ice as you please.

 

Tempeh and Mushroom Fritters with Pickled Cucumber and Chilli Sambal

DSC_0704DSC_0675DSC_0693DSC_0666DSC_0659I’ve finally escaped the Australian East Coast winter and am lucky enough to again be in the warm and welcoming arms of Bali. It’s been a week now since we arrived and we are finally starting to feel like we are away from it all. Our jobs, families, responsibilities good and bad. I always struggle in the first week to let it all go and allow myself yo relax. I straight away start to come up with ideas and projects and then struggle between the guilt of not getting onto them straight away and allowing myself to have a break.

So, I’ve started slow with a couple of little recipes and shoots this week. All enjoyed by the poolside at the end of the day, so really, not too stressful…..

The local market here in Canggu is great for seasonal and cheap produce, it’s a hectic motorbike ride along a busy road to get there so we always try and get as much as we can carry back. I haven’t had the guts to carry a pumpkin on the bike yet but will sometime soon!

These little fritters were a delicious afternoon treat with some cold drinks and jumps in the pool. You can serve them like this or alongside some rice and salad for a more substantial meal. I used button mushrooms here but shitake would be even better. Corn kernels would also work well. If you can’t find Cassava flour, chickpea flour would be a fine substitute.DSC_0710DSC_0715DSC_0718DSC_0653Recipe

Mushroom and Tempeh Fritters

Ingredients

800g tempeh, chopped into 1cm cubes

10 shallots, finely sliced

500g mushrooms

2 1/2 cups cassava flour

1 lemon, zest and juice

1-2 cups water

2 tsp ground coriander

1 large thumb ginger, grated

4 tbs soy sauce

salt and pepper

Handful fresh coriander, chopped

Canola oil for shallow frying

Method

Combine all of the ingredients, except the water, in large bowl. Add one cup of the water and stir to combine, add the rest of the water as needed, until mixture sticks together but isn’t too wet.

Heat the oil in a wok, about 5cm deep. Test it is hot enough by seeing if a cube of bread turns golden in about 20secs.

Fry heaped tablespoons of mixture, in batches, turning frequently, until dark golden brown. Don’t be put off by how dark they go, they need to cook in the middle. Test one if you need.

Drain on paper towel, sprinkle with fresh coriander and serve with samba and pickled cucumber.

Pickled Cucumber

Ingredients

1 small or half a large telegraph cucumber, halved lengthways, seeds scraped out and finely chopped

Handful of fresh parsley, finely chopped

1 cup white vinegar

2 tbs white sugar

salt and pepper

Method

Combine ingredients in a bowl and mix well until sugar dissolves. Refrigerate for at least 20mins, or until needed.

Chilli Sambal

Ingredients

2 brown onions, peeled and chopped

1 whole bulb garlic, cloves peeled and chopped

2 large thumbs ginger, peeled and chopped

10 birdseye chillies

4 stalks lemongrass, white and pale green parts chopped

4 tomatoes, chopped

3 tbs palm sugar

1/4 cup vinegar

juice of 5 small limes

1 tbs fish sauce (optional)

salt and pepper

Method

Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Check for seasoning and adjust to suit.

Keep in a jar in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

 

 

 

Moroccan Seafood Stew with Pearl Cous Cous and Harissa Cream

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When Lisa contacted me and said she was in Aus and would love to do a collaboration shoot with me, I knew it would be a fun day. Having not seen Lisa for five years, we had a lot to catch up on, but, after only a couple of minutes it was like those five years had been just five days. When you have friends like that, time and space don’t seem to matter.

We initially planned to do an outdoor, bush tucker cook-up, to help showcase the Primus gear that Lisa needed to shoot. But, due to one of the biggest storms to hit the East coast in years, flooding, wind and rain found us doing a cute little set-up in my backyard. It was really great working with another passionate foodie and photographer, and not to mention Daniel’s amazing fire-starter skills to keep us warm and set the scene.

The stew was one of the tastiest things I have ever eaten, everyone was really impressed by it yet it was so easy to make. You could use whatever seafood you like, or even change it to meat and vegetables. The flavours were amazing, especially the sauce soaked up with some nice thick sourdough. It also matched really well with the pearl cous cous salad, I love the texture of those little beads.

I also roasted some whole cauliflower in the fire. I haven’t included a recipe here as it is very straightforward. Just rub the whole cauliflower with some olive oil, salt and your favourite spices (I used cumin and sumac). Wrap in foil and cook in the fire or a hot oven for about 20mins, or until tender. It’s delicious dipped in the harissa cream…

Good company, cute set-up, delicious food, a few drinks and a little bit of work. It was a fun day!

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Recipe (adapted from Valli Little)

Serves 8

Moroccan Seafood Stew

Ingredients

Olive oil

2 brown onions, sliced

4 cloves garlic, crushed

2 tbs fresh ginger, grated

2 tbs ras el hanout (spice blend, available in good spice stores)

1 tsp ground cinnamon

2 tsp harissa paste

2 x 400g can crushed tomatoes

1L chicken or veg stock

1 kg seafood marinara mix

1 kg mussels

2 salmon steaks, cubed

2 x 400g cans chickpeas, drained

2 tsp honey

Fresh coriander and toasted almonds to serve

Method

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium to high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, for 2 mins or until soft. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for a further 1min. Add as el hanout, cinnamon, harissa, tomato, chickpeas, honey and stock. Reduce heat to medium low, cook for 10 mins, or until slightly reduced. Add marinara mix, salmon and mussels. Cook for about 10mins, without stirring too much to avoid breaking up the fish. Check for seasoning and add salt and pepper to taste. Top with fresh coriander and flaked almonds.

Serve with cous cous and harissa cream.

Pearl Cous Cous (a rough idea, amounts were not measured on the day)

Ingredients

Pearl cous cous (cooked to packet instructions in chicken or vegetable stock)

Olive oil

Lemon juice

White wine vinegar

Honey

Dried parsley

Fresh coriander

Sultanas

Kalamata olives, sliced

Salt and pepper

Flaked almonds, toasted

Method

Combine all ingredients except for the almonds. Check for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Place in serving bowl and top with almonds just before serving.

Harissa Cream

Ingredients

2 red capsicums, roasted, skin removed

200ml sour cream

2 tbs harissa paste

1 tsp lemon juice

salt

Method

Using a stick blender or in a small processor, blend the capsicum, Harissa paste and lemon juice together until smooth. In a bowl, combine the capsicum mixture with the sour cream. Add a little salt to taste. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baba Ghanoush with Pickled Apple, Walnuts, and Paprika Oil

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This weekend I am co-running a pop-up restaurant in Amsterdam! It’s going to be so much fun, I’m so excited to introduce some new flavours and concepts to the people of Amsterdam. We will be serving an eleven course, plant-based feast, with a little seafood and Kangaroo meat thrown in. We want to celebrate the vegetables though, using locally sourced, seasonal produce and some Australian bush spices. I can’t wait to start cooking!

In the meantime, here is a recipe for the most delicious babganoush you will ever taste. A result of some eggplant growing old on my friends sideboard, he told me to use them for something before they went bad. My specialty! I love having the skill to be able to use anything and make it into something, nothing ever gets wasted!

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Recipe

Ingredients

3 medium eggplants

1/2 cup tahini

1 tsp salt

Juice of 1 lemon

3 cloves garlic, finely grated

pinch chilli flakes, plus extra to serve

1/2 tsp ground cumin

2 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

1 green apple

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

1/2 cup roasted walnuts

Handful coriander leaves

Toasted pita bread to serve

Method

Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees celsius.

Use a fork to pierce the eggplant all over a few times. Using metal tongs, hold them over an open flame for around 10 minutes, turning constantly, until the skin is charred. Place them in a baking dish and continue to cook for a further 20-30mins, until they are very soft and collapsed. (if you don’t have an open flame to char them first, you can do it under a grill or just cook them completely in the oven. You just won’t get the smoky flavour). Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely.

Cut the eggplants in half and scoop out the flesh into a large bowl. Add the tahini, salt, lemon juice, garlic, chilli flakes, cumin and some cracked pepper and using a fork, combine and mash the eggplant until a stringy paste forms. (you can also use a blender but I prefer to keep the texture of the eggplant, I find it goes a bit gluey when processed)

Peel and grate the apple. In a small bowl, combine the grated apple with the vinegar and a pinch of salt. Stir well and allow to sit for at least 10mins, stirring every so often.

Combine the olive oil and the paprika in a small bowl and stir well to combine.

To serve, place the eggplant mixture in a large shallow dish. Drain the apple from any excess liquid and place on top of the eggplant. Sprinkle with the walnuts, coriander leaves, and extra chilli flakes. Drizzle with the smoked paprika oil. Serve with some toasted bread and other mezze dishes if you wish.

 

Spiced Eggplant with Savoy, Lentil and Pomegranate Salad

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It’s becoming more obvious everyday. I think I finally need to make the move, the one I planned to a couple of years ago but got sidetracked by other travels, it’s time to come and live in London for a while. It’s a weird thing, to want to come and live in one of the biggest and coldest cities I’ve ever been to, but I feel there is so much opportunity for me here, as well as one of my dearest friends, and, when it gets too cold, I’ll just shoot off down to Spain or Morocco and warm the cockles. Anyway, I’ve got a few more months here in Europe, I’m sure I’ll have more of an idea by the time we head back to Australia.

So, we finally got to catch up last night, my dear friend and I. The conversation did not have more than a two second gap in it for about five hours straight. I was so excited to cook for her and wanted to make something wholesome and delicious, but, as it is when travelling, I’m also restricted by the ingredients I can use. Luckily there were some spices in the cupboard here and I was able to find the rest of the ingredients in the endless Middle Eastern grocers lining the main street here. So much pita bread!

If large enough, the eggplants are sufficient on there own as a meal, but we ate them alongside some warmed pita bread, hummus and a quinoa salad. Find the recipe for my favourite creamy hummus here.

I adapted this recipe from Green Kitchen Stories, one of my favourite food blogs to turn to when I want some inspiration for a truly healthy and wholesome meal. I also made some little chocolate and almond cakes for dessert, completely sugar, dairy and gluten free. They were so delicious! Unfortunately we were too busy eating and talking to think to get any photos by the time dessert came around!

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Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients

4 large eggplant

Olive oil

2 tbs garam masala

2 tbs curry powder

1 tsp cayenne pepper

salt and pepper

Salad

1 small savoy cabbage, finely sliced

400g can puy lentils, rinsed and drained well

Bunch parsley, finely chopped

1 pomegranate, arils (seeds) removed

1 tbs olive oil

Juice of 1 lemon

1 tbs maple syrup

salt and pepper

To serve, hummus, pita bread, quinoa salad (optional)

Method

Pre-heat oven to 200 degrees celsius. Line a large baking tray with baking paper.

Cut the eggplants in half lengthways and use the tip of a knife to cut a criss cross pattern, about 1cm deep, into the flesh. Drizzle well with olive oil, using fingers to rub all over. Sprinkle with the spices, salt and pepper, and use fingers to rub spices into the cuts. Drizzle with more olive oil if they feel too dry. Place in the oven and cook, for about 45-50mins, or until flesh is dark on top and soft in the centre.

Meanwhile, for the salad, bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Blanch the cabbage, for 1min, drain and rinse under cold water. Leave to drain as much water out as possible. In a small jar, combine the olive oil, lemon juice, maple syrup, salt and pepper and shake well. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, lentils, parsley and dressing and toss to combine.

To serve, place the eggplants on a large serving platter, scatter the salad over the tops and sprinkle with the pomegranate. Serve with sides such as hummus, pita bread and quinoa salad. Enjoy!

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Snake Bean and Coconut Salad

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We’ve been in Ubud for a few days now, hanging out with some amazingly talented people, who are also so down to earth, generous and fun to be around. It makes it hard to move on! I could easily live here for a while, but I find myself saying that about so many places that I visit!

Our beautiful and generous friend, who is also an epic musician, has been so accommodating and I’ve been loving having the use of his kitchen, especially with the local markets on just down the road every morning…even if they do finish at 8am…

Every Warung (small restraurant), that we have eaten at over the past week has had more than one beautiful green salad on offer, a lot of them consisting of green beans, coconut and bean sprouts. So, I wanted to give it a try. My version tastes quite different to the ones I have had so far but I think that is because they use ALOT of oil in everything here. I used less oil, but add more if you like. And PLEASE! Don’t be afraid of the salt. Add it until it tastes good cause there aren’t any other salty elements in this dish.

I know it may seem like this recipe calls for a couple of things you may not be able to get from your local grocery store, but they are easily replaced. Use regular green beans instead of snake beans, but cook them for half the amount of time, and if you can’t get fresh coconut, just use the dried stuff. Add or remove anything you want from this dish, you can’t really go too wrong. Alongside the salad we had some omelette with golden shallots, some turmeric and ginger marinated tofu and the peanut sambal and tomato sambal for which you can find the recipes for in the last post.

Also, how funny are my photos looking! Ive had no nice plates or surfaces to work with and it cracks me up that these pics look like something from the 1987 Women’s Weekly Asian Edition. 😀

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Recipe

Serves 4 as a side dish

Ingredients

1tbs peanut oil

6 golden shallots, finely sliced

4 cloves garlic, grated

6cm piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated

2 tbs yellow curry paste

1 long red chilli, finely sliced

1 small birds eye chilli, finely sliced

500g snake beans, cut into 5cm lengths1 large bunch of water spinach

Flesh from half a mature coconut, finely sliced and toasted, about 1/2 cup

1/2 cup desiccated coconut, toasted

1 1/2 cups bean sprouts

1/2 cup roasted peanuts

juice of 2 limes

1 tbs sugar

salt and pepper

2 tomatoes, sliced

Method

Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the shallots, garlic, ginger, chillies, and curry paste and cook, stirring for 1min. Add the snake beans and continue to cook, stirring, for about 5 mins, or until beans are just cooked. Add the water spinach and cook, stirring, for 1min, or until wilted. Transfer mixture to a large bowl.

Add the coconut, beansprouts, peanuts, lime juice, sugar, and salt and pepper. Stir to combine and check for seasoning. Add more salt if neccesary. Top with the fresh tomato slices.

Menikmati!